Why socks and sandals?

Ok, so socks and sanals may not be the most fashionable footwear, anywhere in the world…

And here I am 5 months in, in the same pair of sandals I have been wearing since 2015! With the sam questions.. like.

How can you wear those on the mountains? They are not apporopriate footwear!

Here’s how it started!

In 2014 I embarked on a crazy pilgrimage from Kathmandu to Canterbury, fully kitted in the latest North Face gear, when someone commented that the Nepali hill people were wearing flip flops and trudging up and down the hills all day with double the weight I had on my back , and here was I in my big boots, unable to keep up with them!

To be fair, in 2010, I attempted to be the first person to walk from John O’Groats to Lands End barefoot, but had to pull out after 442 miles due to a multitude of injuries!

So with that in mind, and not one to be defeated, I decided that, whilst flipflops seemed an unfeasable option for me at that time, I would buy a pair of trekking sandals !

Everyone (well the westerners ) were amazed that I could traverse mountains, and rocky tracks with these ridiculous shoes! The nepalis , however, didnt seem that impressed , but I felt, as they say, empowered, that I could wear these sandals and cross the himalayas (low routes only) with shoes that were not designed for the purpose!

When I returned to the UK, after my epic walk I of course bought ‘proprr’ shoes and quickly forgot about the Nepalis in their fliplops ..this was western civilastion after all !

It was only in May this year, when I decided to go back walking after the brexit fiasco etc that I revisted my Czech made Triop Sandals that I bought in 2015.

When I decided to go walking again, I had one pair of shabby trainers and my sandals on board Ariana, and as I had no money for new boots, I decided to go with the sandals!

1500kms later, after completing the Camino de Santiago (frances) , the Camino Portugues, and the Rota Vicentina, to Cabo de sao vicente, that I realised that actually I didn’t need any of these fancy trekking shoes, and boots…

The sandals were perfect!

After all, feet dry quicker than shoes!

I decided then to stick with the sandals, despite their unfashionable status.

Sure my feet have been wet, coldm and downright uncomfortable, but I have developed a certain resilience in them, and they have definitely become a talking point!

I’m not sure if the Nepali people would be proud of me, but I feel stronger!

TO BE CONTINUED…

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